How can conflicts benefit organizations?

As part of their course Current Trends in Leadership and Change (LFCS05), LFC students have written blog posts about resilience, circular economy practices, stakeholder relations, conflicts in organizations and relational frictions in European monarchies.

Even though conflicts can be seen as something destructive that need to be controlled or avoided, they can be productive and generate positive change (Rossi, 2019, p. 168). Furthermore, conflicts can create value and lead to new opportunities. This blog post discusses conflicts in organizations. How can conflicts benefit organizations and what should be taken into account?

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On Edible Insects, Waste Collection and Urban Farming – Circular Economy Practices

As part of their course Current Trends in Leadership and Change (LFCS05), LFC students have written blog posts about resilience, circular economy practices, stakeholder relations, conflicts in organizations and relational frictions in European monarchies.

Wouldn’t it be great if in the contemporary world of sustainability awareness, different production and consumption functions would generate as little waste and loss as possible? Natural resources would be used sparingly, and materials would be utilised efficiently and sustainably. The harrowing truth is that humankind cannot endlessly use scarce natural resources – for this reason there is a strong demand for a dynamic change. Possibilities for such a change can be explored, for example, on the basis of global megatrends, consumer practices, as well as concepts that aim to be holistic and multidisciplinary. One such notable concept is the circular economy (CE).

 

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Relational frictions in European monarchies

As part of their course Current Trends in Leadership and Change (LFCS05), LFC students have written blog posts about resilience, circular economy practices, stakeholder relations, conflicts in organizations and relational frictions in European monarchies.

Inspired by the political regimes in European countries and their implication in relational leadership, this blog post will investigate the oldest form of sovereignty still present around this continent: monarchies. As monarchies are significantly distinct in Europe’s political landscape, this text is going to focus on the state of relational leadership in monarchical systems. Therefore, the emphasis is hereinafter placed on the political relations of monarchs with the executive power of their country. The blog post briefly introduces the contemporary monarchs’ political role before shifting the focus to the United Kingdom and Spain, where relevant cases to this topic have arisen.

(Boy Wearing Crown Statue. Mike, 2016)

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LFC master’s theses spring 2020

We are happy to share LFC master’s theses from the spring semester 2020. Dear LFC students, congratulations for completing your works!

These theses discuss various topics such as the impact of economic sanctions, Finland in China’s Belt and Road initiative, Finnish policy entrepreneurship in the Arctic Council, and Armenia’s national role conceptions and their effect on the state’s foreign policy. Furthermore, the theses explore customer experience management through retail digitalization, institutional logics perspective in people analytics adoption, green human resource management (GHRM) perspective in Russian companies, the role of documentation during the bidding process for industrial solutions, and perception of key performance indicators by employees. There are also two theses that focus on stakeholder engagement in ecological restoration: one of the works discusses quarry site restoration and the other looks into rehabilitation of abandoned mine lands. As these master’s theses illustrate, Leadership for Change is a multidisciplinary Master’s Degree Programme and the programme provides tools to study diverse phenomena from different fields. Enjoy reading these compelling theses!

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Radical resilience

As part of their course Current Trends in Leadership and Change (LFCS05), LFC students have written blog posts about resilience, circular economy practices, stakeholder relations, conflicts in organizations and relational frictions in European monarchies.

The concept of radical resilience in the absence of state presence or assistance has been emerging in different contexts, such as in the United States. The blog post briefly explores the theoretical background, power relations and practical examples of resilience in the context of a sudden absence of governance structures. It also looks into resilience’s criticism and the concept’s implications for leadership.

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Raisa Foster: “Everything we have taken for granted has suddenly collapsed”

Based on Raisa Foster’s online lecture ‘Art, EcoJustice, and Leadership’ on 20.03.2020

We are living in an era of eco-social crisis, says Dr. Raisa Foster, a multidisciplinary artist and scholar based in Finland. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and other ongoing background crises, she claims that “everything we have taken for granted has suddenly collapsed”.

 

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Sonja Finér: “Socially just transition to a carbon neutral society”

“Socially just transition to a carbon neutral society” is the topic presented by Sonja Finér, Executive Director of Finnwatch, at a serial event hosted at Tampere University by the students of the Leadership for Change Master´s programme.

Sustainability is an important topic for the majority of program students, and the practical implications as well as a better understanding of “social justice” which then leads to “just transition” is a good start for building the knowledge.

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LFC case studies: solving complex challenges through research

Helping a local food bank tackle foodwaste, identifying socially sustainable public procurement practices, increasing the youth turnout in European elections. These were some of the topics that the multidisciplinary teams of LFC students tackled during the case study course organized during the autumn semester 2019.

LFC students presenting the results of their case study research to fellow students, representatives of case organizations and members of the university community in December 2019.

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New graduates from the LFC programme

Six new LFC students have successfully graduated from the programme – congratulations! The LFC students graduate from three different tracks according to their chosen specialization – business studies, politics, or governance; but one can clearly see multidisciplinarity in the students’ works.

The theses this time have focused on a wide range of topics including solidarity economy in the Nordic welfare states, co-creation for sustainable development, water diplomacy in Central Asia, social construction of retail digitalization, depoliticization in Finnish politics, and the neoliberal agency in feminism. Below we provide the short abstracts of the theses with the permanent links to the publications. Enjoy!

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