On Edible Insects, Waste Collection and Urban Farming – Circular Economy Practices

As part of their course Current Trends in Leadership and Change (LFCS05), LFC students have written blog posts about resilience, circular economy practices, stakeholder relations, conflicts in organizations and relational frictions in European monarchies.

Wouldn’t it be great if in the contemporary world of sustainability awareness, different production and consumption functions would generate as little waste and loss as possible? Natural resources would be used sparingly, and materials would be utilised efficiently and sustainably. The harrowing truth is that humankind cannot endlessly use scarce natural resources – for this reason there is a strong demand for a dynamic change. Possibilities for such a change can be explored, for example, on the basis of global megatrends, consumer practices, as well as concepts that aim to be holistic and multidisciplinary. One such notable concept is the circular economy (CE).

 

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Relational frictions in European monarchies

As part of their course Current Trends in Leadership and Change (LFCS05), LFC students have written blog posts about resilience, circular economy practices, stakeholder relations, conflicts in organizations and relational frictions in European monarchies.

Inspired by the political regimes in European countries and their implication in relational leadership, this blog post will investigate the oldest form of sovereignty still present around this continent: monarchies. As monarchies are significantly distinct in Europe’s political landscape, this text is going to focus on the state of relational leadership in monarchical systems. Therefore, the emphasis is hereinafter placed on the political relations of monarchs with the executive power of their country. The blog post briefly introduces the contemporary monarchs’ political role before shifting the focus to the United Kingdom and Spain, where relevant cases to this topic have arisen.

(Boy Wearing Crown Statue. Mike, 2016)

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